Forward motion, Down the Wall ‘Ball-Strikers’ Secret

If you aren’t keeping the club inside (on the forward swing), you could be leaking some major power from your golf shots. When you keep the club inside you force your body, not your arms and hands, to do the heavy lifting. As you know, powerful golf shots come from the core not the arms. Learning to keep the club inside on the downswing is a great way to activate your core and get more distance and consistency.

As John explains in the video, visualizing an imaginary line which you swing along is a great way to train this. It’s even better if you have a golfing pal who can hold out a stick or club to give you objective feedback like John is using in the video.

Some instructors call this following the wall. This can help you visualize what you should be doing. When you follow the wall you will prevent yourself from coming over the top or casting, it sets you up for great hand position at impact.

For more tips on hitting longer straighter drives click here.

Why is this the Worst Golf Tip?

Hey, Doc here again with another free golf lesson for you…

“Keep your head down.”

We’ve all heard this classic piece of bad advice from a well meaning friend or misguided pro. The problem is, this advice is so general and non-specific that its meaning is completely dependent on your unique interpretation. This makes it totally worthless, and more apt to screw your swing up than fix any problem it was intended to.

In the video above 3 time RE/MAX long drive champ Mike Gorton explains why he thinks “keep your head down” is such bad advice, and what you should be doing with your head instead.

As you saw in the video, its normal to move your head in the golf swing, after all it’s an athletic movement and you are not a machine. Any attempt to keep your head in one spot will result in all sorts of mishits.

Instead try focusing on keeping your swing below your head. You don’t want your head getting in the way of your torso and shoulder rotation in the golf swing, as if its some immovable object. No, you want your swing to be natural and comfortable. Lifting your head a bit to keep it out of the way of your shoulder rotation allows a natural swing and improves your mobility.

As explained in the video, you want to feel like your swing is happening below your head. Focus on that feeling instead of keeping your head still. This will result in better swing mechanics and fewer mishits.

For more tips on longer and straighter drives from 3 Time RE/MAX long drive champ Mike Gorton click here.

For better golf,
Doc O’Leary
Head Golf Nut, OHP

High shots – Hybrids Hit Like a 9 Iron on Steroids

Making unexpected shots will take your golf game to the next level. To make these shots you need to know what you, and your clubs, are capable of. By thinking outside of the box you can easily get out of many tricky situations around the golf course and save par.

In the video above Golf Pro Bill McKinney shows you how a hybrid golf club can get you up and over a tree that’s right in front of you, and still have enough carry to reach a green that is 170 yards away.

Normally in a situation like this, most golfers would choose to get over the tree with a 9 iron, sacrificing distance and their chance to make it to the green. This is a safe shot, but there is another option. A club like a #5 Hybrid has enough loft to get over the tree and will give you the extra carry you need to make it to the green.

The secret here is knowing what your clubs are capable of, but also spending time on the range experimenting with different shots. For this shot you simply need to make a shorter quicker swing. By tweaking your normal swing just a bit you can turn your #5 hybrid into a 9 iron on steroids. You’ll be able to clear the tree without sacrificing your score on the hole.

The best part is, if you practice these kinds of specialty golf shots, they won’t even seem risky when you use them on the course, it’ll be business as usual. And did I mention hitting these shots is a lot of fun.

So do yourself a favor, next time you hit the range try some trick shots, it’ll help your score and you’ll have a great time. Click here for more great golf tips from Bill McKinney.

For better golf,
Doc O’Leary
Head Golf Nut, OHP

Greg McHatton’s Cart Pushing Drill For Longer Golf Drives

Hey, Doc here, bringing you yet another free golf tip…

We’ve all heard it time and again – power in the golf swing comes from the core. The problem is, unless you know how to properly use your core, this advice does little good. That’s about to change.

In the video above you find award winning golf instructor and PGA Pro Greg McHatton explaining how to develop massive power from your hips. The kind of raw power that translates into 300 yard drives.

As you can see Greg’s teaching methods can be a bit unorthodox, but it works, and that’s all that really matters. This drill is all about learning how to “drag” the club toward the ball using your core, instead of flipping the head of the club at the ball with your wrists. The key to making this dragging motion work is using your core.

Your hips lead this dragging motion by sliding forward. That’s where the golf cart comes in. We can all slide our hips forward, the question is can we do it in a way that delivers serious power to the golf ball. By forcing yourself to push up against a heavy object, like the golf cart, you will naturally put your lower body into a powerful position. This means your right foot is firmly planted driving into the heavy object and your knees don’t collapse toward each other.

This is also a perfect drill to teach you how to use and feel the ground in the golf swing. You can’t hit 300+ yard drives without feeling and using the ground beneath you.

The trick is ingraining this feeling into your body so you can repeat it without a heavy object to push against. Once you do that you’ll be able to tap into a whole other level of power in your golf swing.

This drill should help teach you how to lead your downswing with your hip slide, not your arms. The hips accelerate the club longitudinally, one of the keys to developing pro level club head speed. If you aren’t sliding forward you are missing out on this crucial longitudinal acceleration.

For more simple and effective golf tips for longer drives check out Greg McHatton’s “Perfect Results” DVD package

For better golf,
Doc O’Leary
Head Golf Nut, OHP

Golf Tip – Secret to Ben Hogan’s Waggle

Hey fellow golf nuts, Doc here with a short but sweet tip for you this week.

As you probably know a good pre-shot routine is crucial if you want to play great golf, all the golfers on the tour have a pre-shot routine and so should you. But I’ve noticed a lot of guys omit one very important part of the pre-shot routine, the waggle.

The waggle does some amazing things for your golf swing and skipping it is just plain madness. Once you realize all the good stuff the waggle does for your golf game you’ll never skip it again.

As Bill McKinney explains in the video the waggle does 5 important things for your golf swing. First, it rehearses you swing path. By moving the club along the proper path you are reminding yourself seconds before you swing where the right path is.

Next, it reminds your wrists how to cock at the top of the swing. A good waggle also reminds your wrists how to release into impact.

The waggle also helps you feel the right amount of tension in your arms and wrists, remember your arms and wrists should be loose and your grip just tight enough to hang onto the club. If you have too much tension you’ll quickly realize it when you waggle and be able to correct it before it ruins a shot.

Lastly, a good waggle gives you some rhythm, and keeps you from stiffening while standing over the ball. As Bill McKinney explains in the video, the rhythm aspect to the waggle is very similar to a baseball player rhythmically moving the bat before each swing. Starting a swing from a stagnant position nearly always results in a jerking motion, it’s just how our muscles work, but if we are already moving we can be incredibly precise and smooth.

How can something as simple as a waggle help so much? The simple answer is that it force feeds your brain very detailed information about where the ball is. That’s why it’s so important to waggle with precision. A sloppy waggle can be worse that no waggle at all.

How does the waggle force feed your brain information? Our brains have two ways of knowing where something is, sight and feel. Sight is pretty simple, look down at the ball. The feel however is a bit different. You can’t reach down and touch the ball with your hand in golf, instead you have to learn to use the club as an extension of your hand.

This is obviously a bit more difficult, that’s where the waggle comes in. Instead of putting the club head right behind the ball once (which tells the feeling part of your brain where that ball is), the waggle allows you to send that message to your brain two or three times in a row, really cementing the feeling of where the ball is into your mind. When you have both sight and feeling working properly you’re much more likely to hit the ball crisp and clean. That’s how something as simple and easy as a waggle can help eliminate fat and thin shots, without actually changing you natural swing.

I’ve got another great free golf video tip from Bill McKinney waiting for you, just Click Here.

For Better Golf,
Doc O’Leary
Head Golf Nut, OHP

Turbo Charge Your Golf Swing: What pitchers know that you don’t…

Hey it’s Doc again with yet another no-cost video lesson to help you crush more long, gorgeous drives.

This week I want to talk about your right elbow, more specifically how getting your right elbow in the right spot during the downswing can add power and distance to your golf drives.

Bill McKinney’s baseball analogy in the video above is probably the best way I’ve ever heard this golf tip explained, that’s why I’m sharing it with you today. We’ve all seen those dramatic Sports Illustrated shots of a baseball pitcher just before he releases the ball with his hand so far behind his elbow it looks physically impossible. Pretty Impressive.

What does that have to do with golf? Well great pitchers and great golfers both know that they can maximize their speed by tucking their right elbow before the moment of truth. Why does this work for golf? Without getting into complex physics it basically loads up power in your swing. The more bent and pulled into your body your right elbow is, and the longer you can hold that position before impact, the more power you have to release right when you hit the ball.

When you tuck your elbow properly it’s like a loaded spring.

You may be thinking to yourself, well that’s great, but how the heck do I naturally get my elbow bent into my body like that? The answer is that although it looks awkward in slow motion it’s actually pretty easy to do when you are swinging.

However, if it doesn’t come naturally or you are having a hard time developing a feel for it you can have a buddy do what Billy is doing in the video with the student. By lightly grabbing a hold of the club as the student starts his downswing, Billy is forcing him to pull the club down and inward toward his body. In order to do this you will naturally tuck that right elbow into your body.

If you don’t have anyone willing to do this for you that’s okay, there’s a simpler way. To do this without a partner simply think about pulling the handle of the golf club downward and in toward your body from the top of your downswing. Just remember it’s not a jerking motion.

For more great power boosting tips from PGA Golf Pro Bill McKinney checkout his Natural Power DVD Package. You’ll be glad you did.

For Better Golf,
Doc O’Leary
Head Golf Nut OHP

Hit Longer Drives By Tricking Your Subsconcious Mind

Hey it’s Doc again with another free golf tip for you…this one’s about hitting the ball longer and straighter so listen up.

Many golfers have a hard time developing the kind of raw power from their lower body that would help them hit the long drives they dream about. For most of them the problem has nothing to do with any lack of ability, instead the problem is in their head.

As you saw Darrell explain in the video the subconscious mind can play tricks on us in the golf swing. We put so much focus into the little white golf ball at our feet that we unknowingly slow or halt our pivoting action once we reach the object of our focus, the golf ball. As you can imagine this has devastating consequences not only for the distance of your golf shots, but their accuracy as well.

How can you fix this distance robbing problem? As you saw in the video it’s pretty darn simple. It’s time to turn the tables on your subconscious mind. Instead of it playing tricks on you, you are going to fool it into focusing on something beyond the golf ball. That’s where the cardboard box comes in.

Having an object to focus on that is well beyond the golf ball will teach you to accelerate beyond the golf ball. This in turn will prevent you from decelerating at impact or stopping your rotation too early. All you need to do is place an old empty cardboard box 18 to 24 inches in front of where your golf ball would normally be. The box should now be the focus of your swing. Put all your energy into smashing it to pieces. Keep in mind you’ll be hitting the box with the toe of your club, don’t try to hit it with a square club face.

The best part is, this golf club head speed boosting trick is easy as pie. There are no tricky concepts, no tedious techniques; all you need to do is spend 20 or 30 minutes beating an empty cardboard box to pieces. Do this once a month or so, just to remind yourself how it feels. If you want to you can buy a special bag that’s made for this purpose.

The result will be longer drives without a whole lot of effort. Just remember to use an old club with a steel shaft for this drill. You don’t want to accidentally snap an expensive club.

For more no nonsense golf tips that’ll boost your drives and slash your scores check out Darrell’s Signature Package. You’ll be glad you did.

For Better Golf,
Doc O’Leary, Head Golf Nut at OHP

Simple Mistakes Spell Death For Your Tee Shots

Doc O’Leary here with another free golf tip for you. This week its all about hitting longer drives.

It’s practically impossible to hit long consistent golf drives without having a setup routine you follow each time you walk up to a tee shot. Even more important, you’re routine should be simple, quick, and get you in the optimum position to fire off long drives time after time. In the clip above, Bobby Schaeffer showed you how his simple routine prevents several common mistakes and prevents you from over-thinking the shot.

Proper Alignment is the first goal of any setup routine for you golf shots. Setting up too close or too far from the ball is a guaranteed way to send a tee shot into the trees. The best way to prevent this is to align the club to the ball and the target, then setup your stance based on where the handle of the club is.

One important thing to remember is that the higher you tee up any golf shot, the more you have to align the golf ball toward the toe of the club, when the club is resting on the ground.

Aligning the ball off center, toward the toe of the club, allows for the extra inch or two of arm extension at impact. Making this small adjustment ensures that you are striking the ball on the sweet spot instead of the heel of the club face.

Okay now that the golf club is lined up properly to the ball it’s time to get your feet set up.

As Bobby shows in the video above, using a few clubs to create a line perpendicular to the target is a great way to help you visualize your setup when practicing. Use this perpendicular line as a guide when you step into the shot. It will ensure that you are placing your left foot in the right spot, then you can choose a placement for your right foot based on comfort.

It’s the alignment of your left foot that needs to be precise. Many golfers walk up to a tee shot and then take some shimmy steps to get comfortable.

This may work sometimes, but it often leads to shifting your left foot out of position, all for the sake of getting comfortable. Using Bobby’s method you can still get comfortable, while maintaining proper alignment.

The final aspect of a good tee shot routine is pace. It shouldn’t be rushed, but it should be brief and to the point.

Don’t waste time standing over the golf ball. It will only get you thinking too much and throw your mental game off. As Bobby said in the video it’s best to think of it like riding a bike, you know what to do, there is very little to think about after the setup.

Now that you have proper alignment nailed down your tee shots will wind up in the fairway a lot more often. All that’s left is adding some serious “umph” to your swing, so you can start nailing those monster tee shots, you know…the kind that make you smile from ear to ear.

I personally can’t think of a better Christmas present for any golfer to give to himself than the gift of ridiculously long and accurate tee shots.

That’s why I’m running a killer deal on one of my hottest “long drive” packages, Bobby Schaeffer’s Beyond Long. Just use coupon code [XMAS2015] without the brackets at checkout to get 20% off the Beyond Long DVD Package.

For Better Golf,
Doc O’Leary
Head Golf Nut, OHP

Gravity “Apple Drop” Green-Side Golf Shot

Nasty lies around the green don’t have to ruin your golf score, you just need the right technique to get the ball close. In this video golf tip, award winning PGA Pro Marc Minier will show you a great way to get the ball up and down, even if it’s caught in deep rough next to the green.

Before we dig into this golf tip you need to know that when Marc says “decel” he is talking about decelerating the club.

Having the golf ball in deep rough a few yards from the green can be a really tough shot. Most golfers are worried that if they swing hard enough to cut through the grass they will overshoot the green.

On the other hand some golfers will chose to take a short back swing and accelerate through impact. This type of shot has its own set of problems including stubbed shots. Relying on your arm power to push through the grass and accelerate through impact is a bad move. You never know what that grass is hiding, and if you hit the ground unexpectedly your club is coming to a stop.

As you saw in the video, the golf shots described above are not very good for this situation.

There is, however, an effective way to get out of thick rough by the green without the chance of way overshooting or stubbing the golf shot, and it’s easy. Simply take the club back and drop it down on the back of the ball “pinching” it out of the rough lie.

You don’t need to worry about your follow through. It simply doesn’t matter. The great thing about this type of shot is that it is consistent and repeatable. This is especially true if you focus on letting the weight of the club do the work.

After a bit of practice with this golf shot you’ll know exactly how far back to take the club for different distances.

The other important factor in this type of golf shot is your club choice. As Marc Minier explained in the video the worse your lie (deeper the rough), the more loft you want.

Choosing a high lofted club, like a 60 degree wedge, allows you to get aggressive and de-loft the club, while not worrying about hitting the golf ball farther than needed.

As always I hope you enjoyed this tip. For more great golf tips from 2006 Southern California PGA teacher of the year Marc Minier Click Here.

For Better Golf,
Doc O’Leary, Head Golf Nut OHP

1 1/2 Inch Ball Shift for Longer More Accurate Drives…

If you want longer more consistent golf shots with fewer fat, duffed, topped, and thin golf shots you need to think a bit about your ball position.

Each golf club you have in your bag is a different length. This means each club has a slightly different swing arc. What does this mean for your golf shots?

Well if you hit your seven iron perfectly then took that exact swing and used your five iron you would hit a fat shot.

The solution is not to change your swing, rather you want to change where the ball is in your stance. Changing your swing leads to terrible inconsistency. Changing the position of the golf ball in your stance is simple repeatable and easy to do.

The best part is that since the lengths of standard golf clubs vary in half inch increments it’s actually quite easy to figure out where each club should be in your stance. Keep in mind there is no hard and fast rule when it comes to ball position, but using this guide will get you pretty close to what will work best for you.

The easiest way to determine the best ball position for each club is to use the seven iron as your standard. The seven iron is the middle length club and should be played in the middle of your stance. Since the eight iron is a half inch shorter it should be played a half inch further back in your stance, and a nine iron should be played a full inch back from center. For longer clubs you’ll move the ball forward in your stance in half inch increments.

The driver is where people have the most difficulty with ball position. The driver is the longest club in your bag and you have probably been told by instructors, magazines, book, or buddies that when hitting your driver the golf ball should be lined up with the inside of your left heel.

I’ve got some news for you, unless your driver is still made out of persimmon wood with a hickory shaft playing the ball off your left heel is simply wrong. Standard driver shafts back in the old days were 43.5 inches long. To be fair many drives were still 43.5 inches long up until about 10 years ago, so your buddy’s advice is outdated but not ancient. The point is most new golf drivers are somewhere between 44.5 to 45.5 inches long.

If you were paying attention earlier you know that a longer shaft means these newer golf drives must be played further forward in your stance. The old guide of using the inside of your left heel won’t work anymore. For long consistent golf drives you need to play the ball a full inch to an inch and a half further forward.

Don’t worry you don’t have to get out a ruler when teeing up. Simply swap the “inside of your left heel” quick guide with “inside of your left toe”. It’s as simple as that. This slightly more forward ball position will compensate for the longer driver shafts and swing arc. The result is a square club face at impact along with longer, and more consistent tee shots.
It doesn’t much easier than that.

For more simple golf tips to improve your swing and your scores click here.

For Better Golf,
Doc O’Leary
Head Golf Nut, OHP Direct

Start Your Golf Downswing “In The Slot” For More Consistency & Distance

This week’s video tip comes to you from a long drive champ and a former long drive world record holder Brad Peterson.

How you take the golf club to the top of your backswing has a huge effect on your swing path and the power of your golf shots. That’s why this week’s video is so important.

Let’s start off with the basics. Each person will have a unique backswing that should feel comfortable, but all good golf backswings should have a few things in common.

First they should all rely primarily on the twisting motion of the torso to get the club back. This twisting of the torso stores power.

Second, you should always load your wrists in the backswing. Loading the wrists means that the club shaft is at about a 90 angle to your hands at the top of the swing. This loading action stores power to be released through impact.

Third, a great golf backswing should set you up to have a proper swing path for the downswing. This last point is the main focus of this video. A proper swing path creates consistency and accuracy. If you get the other two right you may be storing a lot of power, but when your swing path is off you won’t be able to translate that power into long straight golf shots.

To get your swing path off to a good start you need to pay attention to where your hands and club are at the top of your backswing.

As Brad explains in the video, when your hands are too far back your golf club swing path will be too flat. You’ll have trouble getting solid contact with the ball and your shots won’t be straight.

If your hands are too far forward (toward your head) you’ll also have trouble hitting consistent golf shots because your swing path will be too steep. This usually results in popped up shots, you know, the ones that leave a nasty mark on the top of your driver.

Learning these principles is easy, it’s feeling them and knowing where the happy medium is that’s the tough part. As Brad demonstrates in the video that happy medium is usually when your hands and the golf club are over the space between your head and your right shoulder.

A great way to visually check this in your own swing is to get in front of a full length mirror and go through the motions. Just remember to keep an eye on the ceiling fan.

Remember making a solid connection at impact is a lot easier when you start your downswing from the right spot.

To get your hands on Brad’s A-Z golf instructional program check out his 7 Steps to Smokin’ Hot Club Head Speed DVD Package.

Eliminate Impact Fallout [idiot proof tip]

Hey Hotlist Member,

Like most things in golf chipping is all about consistency. Knocking the ball six inches from the pin once in a great while is worthless if you can’t get it close on a regular basis.

Using your wrists is hands down the biggest mistake golfers make when chipping. Using your wrists in a chipping stroke is not only unnecessary, it’s also the number 1 source of duffed shots and double bogeys around the green.

You don’t use your wrists in a putting stroke because you need that stroke to be dead accurate and repeatable. The chip shot is no different. That’s why the video I’ve included above is so important.

The technique may be a bit unorthodox but it works. Your buddies may snicker the first time you use it but when you’re consistently knocking your chip shots in a 4 foot radius of the hole they’ll change their tune real quick.

Okay on to the actual technique. To make your chip shots consistent and repeatable you want to take your wrists completely out of the action. And for short chip shots you’ll be taking your hips out of the action too. All the movement comes from rotating your shoulders.

This technique starts with a special grip on the golf club.

Start by placing your left hand at the very bottom of the grip, where the rubber meets the steel. Allow the grip to rest along your left forearm. Now there should be a slight gap between the grip and your left wrist. This little gap is where you grip the club with your right hand.

Your right hand is there to stabilize the club and press it into your left arm so that your left wrist stays flat. This grip will keep the golf club and your wrists in the proper impact position through the whole swing.

This technique adds consistency because it doesn’t rely on you getting in the proper position for one brief moment. The perfect position is there the whole time.

Now that you’ve got the grip down, the next step is swinging the golf club by rotating your shoulders. Your arms and hips should not be involved. It should feel like your arms and shoulders are locked into a triangle.

This is where the consistency comes from. Now the only variables in your golf chip shots will be how far back you rotate your shoulders and the loft of your golf club.

It may take you a few strokes to get a feel for how much rotation you need to get the ball a certain distance, but after that your golf chip shots will be dead accurate, follow a predictable trajectory every time, and get close to the pin on a regular basis.

This tip can be a real game changer for you.

Sometimes I can’t believe I’m giving away such great info for free. Luckily the DVD package this tip came from is so jam packed with great golf instruction I can give little nuggets like this away and not worry too much about it.

If you want to get a hold of the parts of Bobby Schaeffer’s Walk Through Power that I just can’t stomach giving away for free check out:

Walk Through Power DVD Package

Go ahead check it out now. Your buddies will hate you for it.

For Better Golf,
Doc O’Leary
Head Golf Nut, OHP

Golf Tip – Can A Metronome Help You Sink Putts?

Having a consistent repeatable stroke is a big part of sinking putts. This golf tip will definitely help you sink more 8 to 10 footers. More importantly this putting drill will help you sink those 4 to 6 foot putts where your nerves and the pressure of losing a round are weighing on you.

It’s all about having a consistent rhythm ingrained in your head so that no matter what kind of putt you are facing you know exactly what to do.

The metronome is a great tool for developing rhythm and tempo, after all that’s why musicians have been using them for nearly two centuries.

So how do you use a metronome to improve your putting? It’s very simple. First of all you’re only using the metronome for that very last part of your whole putting routine. It wouldn’t make sense to hold yourself to a strict rhythm while reading and aligning your putts.

Instead you’ll only be using the metronome for about the last 4 seconds of your putting routine, the part where you take your last look at the hole then make your putt. To do this you have to break those last few seconds down into specific movements. As Bobby Schaeffer points out in the video those movements are 1) Your last look at the hole 2) Moving your eyes back to the ball 3) Taking the putter back and 4) Impact with the ball.

When you learn to do these four steps in a set rhythm you’ll be able relax even during tough putts. Having a set routine means you won’t really have to think about much during the stroke, you already know the exact movements you are going to make and how long they will take.

The actual speed you set the metronome to doesn’t matter all that much. What matters it that you learn to use that same rhythm every time you make a putt.

You can certainly use this drill without a metronome but having a metronome will help keep you honest. Also listening to the continuous beats will help you internalize whatever putting rhythm you choose.

For more tips on becoming a master of putting check out Bobby Schaeffer’s Hot Touch Putting.

For Better Golf,
Doc O’Leary
Head Golf Nut, OHP

Golf Tip – Rotate Eyes to Target for More Golf Swing Speed

This drill comes to you from PGA Golf Pro John Darling. This tip is all about allowing your body to make a complete golf swing with full shoulder and core rotation.

Often time the biggest obstacle preventing a full swing is fixating on the ball. Sure you’re going to need to look at the ball during address, in the back-swing, and before impact, but looking at the ball any longer than that can freeze your upper body.

This fixation can prevent full shoulder and torso rotation which is necessary if you want to increase your swing speed. Even more important it can cause deceleration at impact and a whole host of other nasty golf swing problems.

The best way to fix this problem is to hit the range and use the drill in the video above. By making an exaggerated effort to transition your eyes to the target line earlier in your swing, even before impact, you’ll force your body to make a full rotation.

Take your time at first, focus on the rotation. You may also want to make it easy on yourself by teeing the ball up to get a perfect lie. Don’t let a chewed up range get you frustrated. Tees are cheep. By teeing the ball up for a perfect lie the only things you have to focus on are the rotation in your swing and transitioning your eyes to the target line.

Once you get this drill down you’ll be surprised at how smooth and fluid your swing gets.

For more instruction from John Darling check out his Swing Speed Accelerator DVD.

For better golf,
Doc O’Leary
Head Golf Nut, OHP Direct

How Can A Marshmallow Improve You Golf Swing?

Strange tip I know…but I’ve seen this trick help many golfers.

Like Darrell says in the video it is difficult for many golfers to take their mind off the golf ball when practicing.

You may be wondering “why would I want to take my mind off hitting the golf ball, isn’t that the whole point of golf.” Think of it this way, is it possible to make a good golf swing without hitting a ball? I think so.

For many golfers the second you put a ball in front of them their natural swing disappears and they start to hit AT the ball, not THROUGH it.

When you aren’t hitting through the ball you are slowing down at impact. Slowing down at impact can cause a whole bunch of nasty things to happen to your golf swing, not to mention it robs power and distance from your golf shots.

The marshmallow trick allows you to focus on your swing NOT what you are hitting. Once you focus on your golf swing it is much easier to accelerate through the point of impact.

Like Darrell explained in the video the best way to practice with this trick is to swing and imagine hitting an object that is a foot or so past the ball/marshmallow. The ball or marshmallow will naturally get in the way. When the ball is just getting in the way as you accelerate toward the imaginary object you will know that you are hitting through the ball.

This will maximize your distance and and eliminate all the problems that come from decelerating before impact.

For more golf instruction from Darrell Klassen check out his signature series package. It’s a great deal you don’t want to miss out on.